Gebogan

  • gebogan, bali, temple
  • Gebogan, temple, ceremony
  • fruit tower, bali, temple, gebogan

Gebogan, the big offering is made when we have an anniversary of the temple. These towers of food may be two or three meters high, or they may be relatively short. The really tall ones require some skill to carry. The most difficult part is entering the gate to the inner temple, which always has a lintel. The women who carries the BANTEN must stop there is always someone around to help the carrier lift the offering off of her head and put in on the ground.

Then the BANTEN is placed in front of the people who are praying while the maker makes her devotions. In some temples the offering are placed in bales, open pavilions, for a long period of time during the ceremony. In others the offering are taken home immediately after prayer are said. There is always much checking around to see how friends and neighbors made their offering, if there are any new techniques.

In some village, the high offerings are carried to the temple in a procession. Usually each neighborhood association, BANJAR has its own group, each lady dressed identically, with offering generally rather alike. In other villages, the ladies simply make whatever they feel like making and go when they are ready. The processions are sight to behold, led by little girls dressed in lovely brocades, as many as 100 women filing along with the high offering on their heads, all dressed alike, and followed by marching band of gongs and cymbals. Sometimes a person will promise God to have a high offering made for a ceremony if some wish that he can be made come true.

This many be hoped for success on examination, a wish that family member will recover from a sickness. When the prayers have been said and the offering made, the high offering is carried at home, and those who wish may eat any of the food. There is no prohibition about this except of some PEMANGKU and for high priests. God has partaken of the sari of the offering, and it can now no longer be used for religious purposes. There is nothing bad about eating and offering. In fact, sometimes a skewered banana or orange is eaten right in the temple after prayers have been said.